Learning to help my daughter


#1

Hi Skritter community!

My name is Aaron. I’ve been learning Chinese (Mandarin) off-and-on for about 15 years. I started learning in California and at one point in 2001 I knew about 300 characters. Then I moved to Singapore and forgot a lot of it. Who would’ve thought I’d forget most of my Chinese in a mostly ethnic Chinese country, but the reality is that English is heavily spoken here.

Anyway, my five-year-old daughter has started her K2 school year and Chinese reading and writing (simplified) is a key focus. I wanted to be able to help her with homework, so I started studying again in earnest about nine months ago. I started by learning to read about 1200 words on HSK Levels 1-4 using the app “Chinese 3d”. But that only takes me so far, so I subscribed to Skritter to start learning to write characters as well. It’s pretty amazing how quickly you can learn using today’s technology (particularly coupled with the SRS algorithm). My goal is to learn to read and write 3,000 characters by the end of 2015. I appreciate any suggestions you have to help me hit my goal!

Aaron


#2

I find time put in is pretty closely linked to results, so if you consistently put in a certain amount of time each day for a while, say a couple of weeks, you should get a good idea of how much you need to study to complete your goal of 3000 by end of 2015. It’s quite a lot but should be achievable. It will be easier if you just study characters rather than words but bear in mind that this might not help with your comprehension of actual Chinese.


#3

I agree with @ximeng, the main determining factor is how much time you spend. There are of course tons of things you can do to boost your learning, but it’s still the amount of time you spend that matters the most. When it comes to Skritter, my best advice is to spread it out as much as possible throughout the day and make it a habit to review characters when you have a few minutes to spare. That way, you can use longer chunks of time for learning things that aren’t suitable for this kind bite-sized learning.